Youth Olympic Games

Nanjing, China will be hosting the second Youth Olympic Games (YOG) from August 16-28th, 2014. There will be over 5,000 athletes and officials from all over the world. Young athletes will compete in 28 sports.

Sailing is one of the sports represented at the YOG’s.  Sailing will take place at the Jinniu Lake Sailing venue. 

To qualify for the Canadian Youth Olympic Team, click HERE! ** NOW UPDATED**

 

 

2009 Canadian Youth World Team

2009 Canadian Optimist Dinghy Team

2010 Canadian Youth Sailing Team

Teams’ Selection

2014 Canadian Youth World Team qualification criteria **Updated to include Stage #2 qualification events

YOG 2014 Qualification System - Sailing (Country Qualification)

 

2008 Canadian Youth World Team

2008 Canadian Youth Team

Canadian Youth Sailing Teams

Canadian youth are encouraged to pursue goals in the sport of sailing as early as possible. With many junior programs starting for children as young as 6 years of age - there is never an age that is "too young" to get involved!

How to get started?

Click here to find a club in your area CYA Clubs

Youth Sailing Team members

See who is on the Youth Sailing Team and the Youth World Sailing Team  this year

Youth sailing Team qualifiers and criteria?

Canadian Youth Sailing Team Qualification Criteria

Sailing Links of Interest

CYA Fitness Field Test

Mentoring sailing

National Sport Center Background

CYA Events

High School Sailing

Lexicon with English and French Sailing Terms

Ontario Sailing Team Advanced Laser Rigging Guide

Info on Disciplinary Guidelines...

Youth Code of Conduct

Coaches Code of Conduct

Let's Get Moving Campaign!

There are many individuals in Canada concerned about dangerous trends such as childhood obesity, the elimination of physical education in schools, the increase in violent crimes among youth, and the lack of affordable and accessible recreation and sport opportunities. The Canadian Professional Coaches Association (CPCA) is seeking support for a very important initiative that focuses on working together to improve the health and well-being of Canadian children and youth. In consultation with leaders from the health, education, recreation, and sport sectors, CPCA has developed the following global position statement as a focal point for Let's Get Moving campaign.

Happy sailing and see you out on the water!

Youth Code of Conduct

Download the CYA Youth Code of Conduct.

Youth Code of Conduct

Olympic and Paralympic Games

The 2016 Olympic and Paralympic Games will be held in Rio de Janeiro. http://www.rio2016.org/en

Stay tuned to this page for continuing updates on Olympic and Paralympic qualification events and information.

Canadian Olympic Committee

The Canadian Olympic Committee is a national, private, not-for-profit organization committed to sport excellence. It is responsible for all phpects of Canada's involvement in the Olympic movement, including Canada's participation in the Olympic and Pan American Games and a wide variety of programs that promote the Olympic Movement in Canada through cultural and educational means.

First recognized by the International Olympic Committee in 1907, the COC has evolved into a multi-faceted sport organization providing financial support, services and leadership to the Canadian amateur high performance sport community.

The COC is proud to be a member of the Olympic Family and a promoter of the Olympic movement. Learn more about us and what we do. Discover the other Canadian organizations that make up our Olympic Family. Find out who our sponsors are. Whether you're an athlete, coach, student or Olympic fan, this section has something for you.

http://www.olympic.ca

ISAF Criteria

Proposed 2004 ISAF Olympic Regatta Qualification System

Entyr Quotas

  1. A National Olympic Committee (NOC) may have no more than one entry in each of the eleven Olympic events. The identity of the athletes must be finalized not later than xxxxx (insert ATHOC required date).
  2. The maximum number of national-authority entries ("entry quota") for each of the 11Olympic events will be as per the table below.
  3. The number of athletes is: 18 from the host National Olympic Committee, plus 382 from other national authorities, for a total of 400.
  4. The ISAF may modify the number of athletes in a specific event, after the last valid qualifying event, in order to achieve the maximum number of athletes allowed by the IOC for sailing.

Selection Criteria

Apply for the 2014 Canadian Sailing Team

2014-15 Canadian Sailing Team Sport Canada Carding Criteria

Santander 2014 ISAF Sailing World Championships Qualification System **NEW**

2015 Pan Am Games Qualification
 **NEW**
 

2013 CST Team Structure 


Athlete Appeal Procedure

The Canadian Sailing Team is selected annually from Canadian sailors who are competing in the Olympic and Paralympic events. Selection for the Canadian Sailing Team is based upon the results of the World Championships and National Qualification Regattas.

 

MAJOR EVENT QUALIFICATIONS

2012 Canadian Sailing Olympic and Paralympic Trials are now published and are available upon request. Contact the HP TEAM for details. 

Schedule "A"- Nationality Policy for Major Games and ISAF Events 

Canadian Sailing Team Members

The Canadian Sailing Team is selected annually from Canadian sailors who are competing in the Olympic and Paralympic events. Selection for the Canadian Sailing Team is based upon the results of the World Championships, European Championships and National Qualification Regattas. For a more detailed description of qualification, click here.

The eleven Olympic events are: Neilpride RX:S men and women, Laser Men, Laser Radial women, Finn men, 470 men, 470 women, 49er, Star & Women's Match Racing. The Paralympic events are the Sonar and 2.4m and SKUD-18.
Team members receive coaching and financial assistance, and represent Canada in international competitions and major games (Olympic, Paralympic, Pan American and University Games).

2012 Canadian Sailing Team (http://www.canadiansailingteam.ca)

2011 Canadian Sailing Team
 (Podium Team, Senior Development Team, Development Team)  

2010 Canadian Sailing Team

2010 Canadian Sailing Team Status Members

2009 Canadian Sailing Team

2009 Canadian Sailing Team Status Members

2008 Canadian Olympic Sailing Team

Videos

RCYC Fundraiser sailing team video

Spirit of Canada

Frequently Asked Questions

What is the Canadian Sailing Team Division?
What is the ADC?
Who are the members of the ADC?
Who are the Staff members of the Canadian Sailing Team?
How do I qualify for the Canadian Sailing Team and Sport Canada Carding?
What do I receive as a carded athlete?
How are "Worlds Funding" and "Block Funding" calculated?
What Expenses can be claimed against World and Block Funding Allocations?
What types of Team Selection Criteria are utilized?
When will criteria relative to team selection be published?

What is the Canadian Sailing Team Division?

The Canadian Sailing Team Division is responsible for the development and maintenance of the high performance sailing programs that will ensure Canada’s best performance at the Olympic Games and international competitions. The division operates at the national team level for Olympic and Paralympic Games, Pan Am Games and Olympic/Paralympic/ISAF World Championships.

Back to list of questions

 

What is the ADC?

The “ADC” is the Athlete Development Committee. The volunteer based committee responsible for establishing policy and criteria for the operation of the National Team Programs.

Back to list of questions

 

Who are the members of the ADC?

ADC Chairperson: Phil Gow
Olympic Development Committee Members:

Frank McLaughlin

Quentin Pollock
Tine Moberg-Parker

Paul Davis

Martin TenHove
Oskar Johansson (Athlete Rep)

 

Back to list of questions

 

Who are the Staff members of the Canadian Sailing Team?

High Performance Director:
High Performance Coordinator:
National Team Coach/Manager:
National Team Coach/Manager:
National Team Coach/Manager:

Ken Dool
Colleen Coderre 
Erik Stibbe    
Steve Mitchell

Brian Todd

 

Back to list of questions

 

How do I qualify for the Canadian Sailing Team and Sport Canada Carding?

Visit http://www.sailing.ca/teams/canadian_sailing_team/selection_criteria/.

Back to list of questions

 

What do I receive as a carded athlete?

As a carded member of the Canadian sailing team you receive access to the following:

  1. Financial Assistance Program and Tax Receipting
  2. Direct Financial Support from CYA via Block Funding and Worlds Funding, this support does not cover the total costs of any single program but rather helps offset costs associated with your training and competition program.
  3. Access to CYA boat insurance program.
  4. Sport Canada Athlete Assistance - $1500/month for Senior Card athletes and $900/month for Development Card Athletes or those carded at Senior Card level for first time.
  5. Access to tuition and deferred tuition programs through Sport Canada.
  6. Access to coaching support as designated/approved for each class by the High Performance Director
  7. Assistance in developing and monitoring annual training plan.
  8. Voice at the CYA Board Directors, Olympic Development Committee and Executive Committee via athlete representative as selected by team members.
  9. Voice at Canadian Olympic Committee, Athletes Can.
  10. Correspondence via email, web-site and mail-outs regarding activities and direction of the Canadian Sailing Team and the Canadian Yachting Association.
  11. Services of one of the three designated Canadian Sport Centres (BC, Ontario, Atlantic)
  12. The benefits available through Athletes Can such as free cell phone and calling plans from Bell Mobility and free internet service from

Back to list of questions

 

How are "Worlds Funding" and "Block Funding" calculated?

Worlds Funding: Financial support designated by the CST to each athlete, to be used exclusively for the purpose of qualifying for and/or attending the World Championships in the class in which you are carded.

Block Funding: Financial support designated by the CST to each athlete, to be used to offset costs related to all other approved training/competitive events.

Reimbursement of funding for activities outside these parameters will only be based on a pre-approved agreement with the High Performance Director.

The athlete allocations are based on the overall budgetary limits of the association.  Each Program / Athlete receives funding based on the priorities set out by the Olympic Development Committee working in conjunction and within the limits and directions of the Canadian Sport Review Panel.

The team is ranked according to the ranking structure set out in the annual Carding Criteria.  Athletes ranking within tier 1-3 attract the lion’s share of the available CYA funding while those in tier 4 and development level receive significantly less.

A similar system exists for paralympic athletes. 

Back to list of questions

 

What Expenses can be claimed against World and Block Funding Allocations?

The following expenses can be claimed against World or Block funding allocation forms:

Travel:  
Air Travel:
Bus/Train:
Ferry/Taxi:
Car Rental
Private Auto
Actual return costs up to economy rates including connecting ground transportation. Original receipts, air coupons required.
Actual costs. Original receipts required.
Actual costs. Original receipts required.
Actual cost, including collision insurance. Original receipts required.
A rate of $0.36/km will be reimbursed. Gasoline receipts required.
A rate of $0.46/km will be reimbursed if towing. Gasoline receipts required.
Equipment Transport:  
Boat Shipment: Actual costs for container/shipping/airfreight/customs .... Original receipts required.
Accommodation:  
Hotel: Most economical possible with original receipts. Hotel/Motel receipt is required, credit card slip only is not sufficient.
$13.50/day will be reimbursed without receipts.
Meals:
Breakfast:
Lunch:
Dinner:
no receipts are required.
$10.00/day
$10.30/day
$27.60/day
Entry Fee: Receipt required for actual entry costs.

 

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What types of Team Selection Criteria are utilized?

Objective Criteria will be utilized by the Olympic Development Committee in decisions relative to athletes in the following areas:

  • National Team Status (i.e. selection to National Team for carding purposes, carding criteria is utilized)
  • Major Games Teams (e.g. Olympic Team, Paralympic Team, Pan American Games Team and other appropriate "Major Games" Teams)
  • CST Financial Support
  1. Block funding and Worlds blocks based on rank within team which is based on Carding Status:
    Tiers 1-4 and Development Athletes
     
  2. The ODC reserves the right to provide financial assistance to additional athletes as identified by, but not restricted to, the following:
    • "Elite" performers returning following "retirement" from Olympic Class sailing
    • Youth/Development athletes having demonstrated elite international performance at age group events
    • Recognized athletes’ having not achieved carding status

Areas where subjective criteria will be used in selecting athletes:

  • Training events, not limited to camps and clinics where "closed" training events require number limits (i.e. quality control, organizing authority stipulation, etc...)

Back to list of questions

 

When will criteria relative to team selection be published?

Where objective criteria as outlined above are utilized for selecting athletes for participation in activities, the criteria to be used will be published in advance as per the Athlete Agreement.

Where subjective criteria are utilized as outlined above, the time frame over which athletes are evaluated will be published. The subjectivity used in selection is not realistically defined, as then it becomes an objective measure. Instead the ODC subjective evaluation is based on coach opinion of what is most appropriate and fundamentally sound in achieving the goals of the association in consideration of athlete interests. This evaluation will include but is not limited to: past performance in training and competition, estimation of future performance potential, team chemistry, value of long term CYA investment and so on.

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Sailing Team History

In the spring of 1924 a group of yachtsmen from the Yacht Racing Association of Lake Ontario decided to hold a special competition. The purpose of the event was to select a sailor who could represent Canada at the Olympics in Paris that summer. This was the beginning of Canada's Olympic sailing effort.

While sailing had been an official part of Olympic competition since 1912, it was not until 1924 that Canada entered a team. Under the auspices of the Royal Canadian Yacht Club of Toronto, a committee conducted trials in the grey, still-frigid waters of Lake Ontario. The trials consisted of four series with ten competitors form five clubs taking part. Eventually, Norman Robertson of Hamilton emerged to win the finals and the right to go to Paris and represent Canada in the single-handed class.

Racing on the Seine at Meulan that July, Robertson finished seventh out of 17 nations in each of the two series that formed the basis of competition. It was a respectable first outing, but not surprisingly, he was eliminated from medal contention. Far more important than his standing, though, was the fact that Robertson's effort had finally broken the ice and Canada had officially entered the world of Olympic sailing.

While the name of Norman Robertson will always stand in the annals of Canadian yachting as our first Olympic sailor, Canada's first team effort dates to the 1932 Olympics in Los Angeles. It was in that year that the Canadian Yachting Association (CYA) was formed and, under its aegis and inspiration, Canada sent crews to compete in the Six Metre, Eight Metre, Star and Olympic Monotype classes. Fleets in those pre-war years were considerably smaller than today's and it was only in the Star and Monotype classes that a truly international field competed. H.E. Wylie was Canada's Star skipper and Reg Dixon sailed the single-handed Snowbird dinghy. Wylie's final standing was fourth out of seven boats and Dixon's placed fifth out of 11. For an Association barely off the ground, these results were more than simply creditable.

The 1936 Olympics, held against the sinister backdrop of Hitler's Berlin, are today notable primarily for the great Jesse Owen's triple gold medal performance in track and field event. In sailing the largest fleet of sailboats ever seen at an Olympics gathered at the Baltic seaport of Kiel. The stage was set for some brilliant displays of yachtsmanship, but sadly, as with several other events, sailing fell prey to dispute and acrimony stemming from the heightened political conditions of the day.

The 1948 Olympics in Torbay, England are generally considered the first at which sailing really came into its own as a sport. This is certainly true for Canada. With the lessons of the pre-war years behind them, the Canadian team was prepared to give its best shot yet.

Sailing in the Firefly, Star and Swallow classes, Paul McLaughlin, John Robertson and Bill Gooderham tallied fifth, seventh and eight-place finishes, respectively. The fleets for each class were large and the standings helped to garner new recognition for Canada's sailing effort at home and abroad.

In the next two Olympics, Canada continued its solidly impressive performance. Paul McLaughlin, who had acted as team manager in 1948, again led the team to a strong finish in 1952. In 1956, Bruce Kirby (later to design the Laser and Canada 1 & 2) in the Finn class and Dave Howard in the Dragon class, sailed Canada to sound finishes in Melbourne, Australia. As Canada competed in each successive Olympics, the team learned more and more about the practical advantages of alternate crew, proper management and coaching.

While the Canadian sailing team and the CYA have always had the winning of Olympic medals as their foremost goal, they have also emphasized participation in the numerous international regattas that preceded each Olympics. These regattas serve as a way of selecting the best crews for the Olympic competition team and allow the crews to hone their competitive skills against other world-class sailors. In 1959, Canadian sailing received a great boost when Walter Windyer of Toronto won the World Dragon Championships in Denmark. It was an accomplishment that presaged great things for Canada in the 1960 Olympics. Sadly, Windyer fell ill just prior to the regatta in Italy and was not able to compete. He died shortly afterwards and although his place on the team was filled admirably by Sandy McDonald (who finished fifth out of 27 countries); the loss to the team and to sailing generally was keenly felt. The inspiration of Windyer's success led to increased encouragement for Canadian sailors at home.

On the Olympic front, medals were still elusive despite continued strong showings by Canadian crews. In the 1964 Olympics in Tokyo, Sandy McDonald sailing in the 5.5 metre class skippered his crew to a seventh place finish. The Tokyo Games also saw the first Olympic appearance of Vancouver's Dave Miller in the Star class. Miller also placed seventh in his class, but this finish was a prelude to greater accomplishments in the years ahead.

At the 1968 Olympics in Mexico, Canada for the first time arrived equipped with alternate crew, complementary staff and spare boats - the kind of things the team needed all along to stay on par with other nations. The results were indicative of this stronger emphasis on organization and technical preparation: Steve Tupper of Vancouver sailed to a fourth place finish in the Dragon class, Roger Green turned in a strong performance in the Flying Dutchman and Stan Leibel placed sixth in the 5.5 Metre class.

All the while the Canadian sailing team had been competing at the international level; the CYA had been working behind the scenes to create a national sailing program in the yacht clubs across the country, developing young sailing talent and fostering the growth of the sport. In 1972 this work paid off. Dave Miller, the promising young Star sailor from Vancouver, along with Paul Cote and John Ekels sailed a Soling to Canada's first Olympic medal in sailing. With their bronze medal win, Canadian sailing may be said to have truly arrived on the international scene. While the team failed to repeat Miller's medal-winning performance at the Montreal Games in 1976, the team as a whole still finished strongly in all classes against stiff competition.

With Canada's boycott of the 1980 Olympics in the Soviet Union, it was not until l984 that Canadian crews once again competed in Olympics competition. Sailing off Los Angeles, the team posted its best Olympic performance - three medals in seven classes. Terry McLaughlin and Evert Bastet won Canada's first-ever Silver medal in the Flying Dutchman class, while teammates Terry Neilson and Hans Fogh, Steve Calder and John Kerr of Toronto, won Bronze medals in the Finn and Soling classes.

In 1988 the Olympic Regatta was held in Pussan, Korea. The sailing conditions were extremely difficult. Canada placed fourth overall out of sixty-one countries and was only one of six sports that captured a medal for Canada. The Bronze medal was won by Frank McLaughlin and John Millen in the Flying Dutchman class. Another great glory for the Canadian Olympic Team was the proud and heroic feat of Lawrence Lemieux, the Finn sailor. His act of saving a disabled sailor during an Olympic race in which he was second brought a great deal of pride and dignity to the team. Lawrence received an Olympic medal of heroism for his actions.

The Barcelona '92 Games started of with two disasters for the Canadian team. First, Murray McCaig, the young windsurfer from Manitoba, was struck by a police car while bicycling through the Olympic village the day before the first race. The injury that Murray sustained to his leg held him out of the Olympic Competition. Then the two-time Finn world champion, Hank Lammens, was disqualified from a race he previously won, because a life jacket was mysteriously missing from his boat during a post race inspection. Ross Macdonald and Eric Jespersen of the Royal Vancouver Yacht Club over-came all these distractions to win a bronze medal for Canada in the Star class. Macdonald and Jespersen established a "best ever" performance for the Canadian team in that class. The Tornado team of David Sweeny and Kevin Smith of the Royal Canadian Yacht Club also established a "best ever" performance with a fifth place position. Canada placed seventh country in the medal ranking and 10th in the top eight rank.

The 1996 Olympic Regatta in Savannah was a test of endurance for all, with light winds and thunderstorms creating difficult conditions. The Canadian team of 10 classes for the Olympics and 1 for the Paralympics saw some excellent results with athletes winning races in five of 10 events and some massive disappointments with Canadians being disqualified from two of those wins. The Soling team of Bill Abbott, Joanne Abbott and Brad Boston, qualifying for the Match Racing with a 4th finish in the fleet race and finishing in 8th position, achieved the best performance. Richard Clarke (Finn class) and Penny Davis/Leigh Andrews (470 class) both finished 9th overall. The Paralympic event was a great success for sailing for disabled, and especially for Canada, with our Sonar team helmed by David Cook winning a silver medal.

The 2000 Olympic Regatta in Sydney saw fierce competition in all classes. Canadian sailors met the qualification standards to compete in 6 of 11 classes, as well as both Paralympic Classes. The Canadian highlights were the fifth place finish of Ross MacDonald and Kai Bjorn in the tough Star class, and Beth Calkin's 11th place finish in the Europe class. She amazed us all, coming back from a very debilitating back injury. The Sonar team of Dave Williams, Brian MacDonald, Paul Tingley & Jamie Whitman (spare) captured the second Canadian medal in a Paralympic Game with their impressive Bronze medal win.

The 2004 Olympic regatta in Athens, Greece, was a spectacular coming home celebration for the modern Olympic Games.  The Waters of the Agean Saronikos Gulf provided a fantastic venue for the regatta.  With the Parthenonvisible in the distance, Canada once again came away victorious with a sliver medal in the Star class by Ross MacDonald and Mike Wolfs. 

The 2004 Olympic team was generally very yong and most of the athletes have continued campaigning hard for the games in 2008.  Those efforts are already starting to show with steadily improving results and nearly every class having a Canadian ranked in the top 10 of the ISAF World Ranking Lists.

The past quadrennial has seen the sport take a giant leap towards professionalism, with most medal winners being full time athletes, dedicating themselves completely to their athletic career in sailing. If Canada is to excel we must work hard to expand and improve our coaching services and financial support for our athletes, while maintaining the spirit and dedication that has fostered excellent results in the past.

The Canadian Sailing Team represents a triumph of talent, perseverance and dedication of which all Canadians can be proud. It has come a long way since Norm Robertson's inaugural effort back in 1924, and with the Olympics almost upon us, the future looks even better. With not just the wind but the spirit of the country behind them, the present team can further add to the luster and distinction of a truly national sporting tradition.

Click here for a list of all Canadian Olympic Sailing competitors

Members

Team Members

World Youth Team 2008

Class Athlete ISAF
Sailor
Province Club
Laser Robert Davis ON KYC
Laser Radial Isabella Bertold BC RVYC
29er Helm Alanna Foscarini ON NYC
29er Crew Alison Ludzki ON NYC
29er Helm Eric Chouinard QC RSLYC
29er Crew Alex Chouinard QC RSLYC
Multi Hull Helm Nick Schwenger ON BSBC
Multi Hull Crew Amy McNeill ON EYC
Team Leader Tine Moberg-Parker BC  
Coach Matthieu Dubreucq QC  

 

For any corrections or updates, please contact WebMaster

Sport Canada AAP

The Athlete Assistance Program (AAP) Policies and Procedures are currently under revision. Revised AAP Policies and Procedures will be placed on the Sport Canada web site as soon as available. For questions relating to AAP policies please contact Bob Price, Manager AAP (819) 956-8027 or by e-mail at .

Click here to visit Sport Canada and download

National Sailing Teams

 

Youth Team Members 2008

Click on the name of the athlete or their picture to view their biography


Male Singlehanded

Robert Davis Evert McLaughlin
Goeff Abel Geoff Abel Greg Clunies Greg Clunies
Andy Wong Andy Wong Oliver Darroch Oliver Darroch



Female Singlehanded

No Picture Julia Bailey Ingrid Merry Ingrid Merry
Caroline Morgan Caroline Morgan Vanessa Dallaire-Lagace Vanessa Dallaire-Lagacé
Isabella Bertold Isabella Bertold Joanne Prokop Joanne Prokop



Male Doublehanded

 

Peter Soosalu Peter Soosalu Jonathan Reid Jonathan Reid
Teddy Skiffington Teddy Skiffington    



Female Doublehanded

 

Alanna Foscarini Alison Ludzki
Dana Archibald Karen Filbee-Dexter



Hobie 16

 

Mark Patakay Mark Pataky Jon Scott
Nicolas Schwenger Nicholas Schwenger William Schwenger William Schwenger



RS:X

 

David Hayes

Resources

2014 Athlete Handbook

Application Forms and Deadlines

CST Application  
 

Sail Canada Structure
Sail Canada Governance Structure
High Performance Team 
Ken Dool
Steve Mitchell
Erik Stibbe
Mark Asquith
Chris Cook
Colleen Coderre

Sail Canada National Team Policies

2014 Sport Canada Carding Criteria
2014 FAP claim submission guidelines
Schedule"A"- Nationality Policy for Major Games and ISAF events

Sport Canada Athlete Assistance Program (AAP)

Living and Training Allowance
 - 8.2 (Sail Canada administered)
Tuition Support - 8.3 (Sail Canada administered)
Deferred Tuition - 8.3.2 (Sail Canada administered)
Retirement Assistance - 8.4 

Athlete Benefits

Sail Canada Financial Assistance Program - tax receipted fundraising program
Helly Hansen pro deal- contact Sail Canada for enrolment 
Bell Connect Program - Senior carded athletes eligible. 
Oakley discount program - Sail Canada administered
Discount Car Rentals
Health and Dental benefits
Health Insurance Coverage - In Canada & Out of Canada - Athlete enrolment through Sail Canada
World-wide hull insurance coverage (Sail Canada administered).
Harken - discount program - Sail Canada administered


Funding Opportunities

Canadian Athletes NOW Fund
AthletesCAN Team Investors Fund
Petro Canada FACE program

Athlete Governance
Athlete representative positions


Anti-Doping

Canadian Centre for Ethics in Sport (CCES) - The mission of the CCES is to promote ethical conduct in all aspects of sport in Canada. 
Globaldro - The Global Drug Reference Online (Global DRO) provides athletes and support personnel with information about the prohibited status of specific substances based on the current World Anti-Doping Agency (WADA) Prohibited List.
Therapeutic Exemption 

Links to Partners and Agencies

AthletesCAN

Own the Podium

Canadian Olympic Committee

Canadian Paralympic Committee

Canadian Red Cross

Canadian Sport Center - Atlantic

Canadian Sport Center - Calgary

Canadian Sport Center - Manitoba

Canadian Sport Center - Ontario

Canadian Sport Center - Pacific

Canadian Sport Center - Saskatchewan

National Multisport Centre - Montreal

International Sailing Federation

International Association of Disabled Sailing

Wind Athletes

Insurance in and out of Canada

Insurance out of Canada

Coaching Association of Canada

Sport Dispute Resolution Centre of Canada

Sport Matters - Where Canadian Sport Connects

Sport Research Intelligence Sportive

True Sport

 

Anti-doping
Sail Canada endorses the principles of the Canadian Policy against Doping in Sport 2011.  It is incumbent on every sailor/athlete to be aware of this policy and to understand the consequences.
Athletes are subject to in-competition and out of competition testing, depending on their status.  Sail Canada supports the measures taken by Sport Canada and its agents and ISAF and its agents in the fight against doping in sport.

For information regarding ISAF’s current anti-doping regulations, please visit http://www.sailing.org/anti-doping.php.

2007 Prohibited Substances List:
http://www.wada-ama.org/rtecontent/document/2007_List_En.pdf

Youth Team

text goes in here

Youth

Canadian youth are encouraged to pursue goals in the sport of sailing as early as possible. With many junior programs starting for children as young as 6 years of age - there is never an age that is "too young" to get involved!

How to get started?

Click here to find a club in your area CYA Clubs

Youth Sailing Team members

See who is on the Youth Sailing Team and the Youth World Sailnig Team this year and in the past years

Youth sailing Team qualifiers and criteria?

2009 Canadian Youth Sailing Team Qualification Criteria

Sailing Links of Interest

CYA Fitness Field Test

Mentoring sailing

National Sport Center Background

CYA Events

High School Sailing

Lexicon with English and French Sailing Terms

Ontario Sailing Team Advanced Laser Rigging Guide

Info on Disciplinary Guidelines...

Youth Code of Conduct

Coaches Code of Conduct

Let's Get Moving Campaign!

There are many individuals in Canada concerned about dangerous trends such as childhood obesity, the elimination of physical education in schools, the increase in violent crimes among youth, and the lack of affordable and accessible recreation and sport opportunities. The Canadian Professional Coaches Association (CPCA) is seeking support for a very important initiative that focuses on working together to improve the health and well-being of Canadian children and youth. In consultation with leaders from the health, education, recreation, and sport sectors, CPCA has developed the following global position statement as a focal point for Let's Get Moving campaign.

Happy sailing and see you out on the water!

Olympic and Paralympic Classes

The International Sailing Federation (ISAF) has selected nine one-design classes for the eleven Olympic sailing events to be contested at the 2008 Olympic Games in Beijing, China. Sailing events are to be held in Qindao, China.

(Click on the equipment to link to it's description):

Equipment Event Discipline
Radial Women's Singlehanded Dinghy Fleet Racing
Finn Men's Singlehanded Dinghy Fleet Racing
470 Men Men's Doublehanded Dinghy Fleet Racing
470 Women Women's Doublehanded Dinghy Fleet Racing
49er Open Doublehanded High Performance Dinghy Fleet Racing
Laser Open Singlehanded Dinghy Fleet Racing
NeilPryde RS:X Men Men's Windsurfer Fleet Racing
NeilPryde RS:X Women Women's Windsurfer Fleet Racing
Star Men's Doublehanded Keelboat Fleet Racing
Tornado Open Doublehanded Multihull Fleet Racing
Yngling Women's Triplehanded Keelboat Fleet Racing

Radial (Women's Singlehanded Dinghy)

The Laser Radial sail was originally designed for training and as an introduction to Laser sailing. But since the aim of the International Sailing Federation is to increase the participation of emerging nations in the Olympic games by right, then the availability of the Laser Radial in these nations was a huge boost to achieving that goal. Therefore the Radial is now the Olympic Women's Singlehanded class and will have a start for the first time in China 2008.
Visit the web page for the International Laser Class at: www.laserinternational.org
or the homepage for the North American Laser Class: www.laser.org

FINN (Men's Singlehanded Dinghy)

A high-performance, refined sailboat, the Finn ranks as one of the world's great boats. Because each rig is tailored to each individual's style. Sailing ability is key and superior sailing ability wins!
A one-man centerboard dinghy, the Finn requires tremendous physical exertion and mental concentration. This combination of excellent craft with sophisticated competitor makes Finn racing unique.
Finn sailors are strong, fit and tolerant of long periods of concentration and physical exertion. Averaging more than 6' in height, they weigh in at 190+ lbs. and are unusually tough. Finn sailors train hard for competition and are known as well-rounded athletes with proven general sailing skills.
The 115-square-foot sail is fully adjustable, and its shape bears directly on performance and boat speed, the Finn is extremely responsive. Mastery of the craft is never quite fully achieved. Finn sailors may have sailed for years, yet find some small nuance of tactics, weight or other adjustment yielding a greater result and luring them to a lifelong love of the boat.
Designed by Swedish sailor Rickard Sarby in 1949, the boat was the winner of a design competition to provide the best possible singlehanded boat for the 1952 Olympics in Finland. The new Finn challenged the sailor to the maximum, which immediately attracted many competitors. The Finn remains today as the oldest continuous class in Olympic sailing. Over 12,000 of the boats have been built worldwide and at least 65 nations have active Finn fleets.
Visit the web page for the International Finn class at: www.finnclass.org

470 (Men and Women's Doublehanded Dinghy)

The everyman/woman boat of competitive racing, the 470 is sailed by young or old, experienced or beginning sailor. In 1963, French architect Andre Cornu designed the two-handed centerboard boat as a modern high performance fiberglass planing dinghy which could be sailed by anyone. The 470 is directly credited with drawing many new sailors to the sport during the 1960s and '70s.
An Olympic class boat since 1976, 470s are sailed today for both family recreation and superior competition by more than 30,000 sailors in 42 countries worldwide. The 470 is so popular that its annual World Championship is considered one of sailing's major international regattas attended by sailors and spectators from around the world.
A light and narrow boat (length 15'6" and beam 5'6" with a weight of 264 lbs.), the 470 responds easily and immediately to body movement. Thus, the sailors' teamwork is critical. The skipper is usually smaller and lighter (5'5" to 5'10" and 125-140 lbs.), and the crew is usually taller and light (5'10" to 6'2" yet only 135-150 lbs.). The crew's build lets him or her hang far out on the trapeze to keep the boat level in all conditions.
In 1988, women officially entered Olympic sailing competition with the first-ever 470 Women's event. This boat is especially well-suited to women's competition because of its light weight, maneuverability and light crew weight requirement. The United States won the first 470 Women's gold medal.
Visit the web page for the International 470 Class at: www.470.org

49er (Open Doublehanded High Performance Dinghy)

This Australian designed 16-foot double-trapeze skiff is high-tech and ultra-fast. Retractable wings spread to nine feet and allow the crew to leverage their weight in order to keep the dinghy from heeling over too far. With a huge sail area for such a small boat -- 639 sq. feet -- the 49er can sail faster than the speed of wind.
The relationship between skipper and crew is critical on the 49er, perhaps more so than on any other Olympic boat. Going so fast on the edge of control means that one slip can mean a flip. The boat attracts competitors looking for speed and excitement. Made of fiberglass and carbon fiber to be strong and light, the 49er weighs 275 pounds when fully rigged. The 49er appeals to sailors who like to live life on the edge.
Visit the web page for the International 49er Class at: www.49er.org

LASER (Open Singlehanded Dinghy)

The Laser has been called the world's premier one-man racing sailboat. With 150,000 Lasers sailing in 85 countries, this boat has motivated more sailors--from juniors to masters--to excel in the sport than any design in the history of sailing. It is fast, responsive, lightweight (cartoppable), and virtually maintenance free. The Laser's accessibility and modest price make it an Olympic sailor's dream. An added bonus is the 1,000 worldwide regattas held each year by the Laser Class Association.
Designed by Canadian Bruce Kirby in 1969 and first produced in 1970, the Laser caught on during a boom period for recreational sailing. However, the design has proven its ability to survive more trying times as well, reaching its current level of popularity with minimal backpedaling over the years. Perhaps it is because every sailor seems to come in contact with the Laser at least once in his or her sailing career, and the boat is so endearing that many cannot continue racing without getting back to their Laser roots at least once in a while.
Though the Laser is offered with three different rig sizes for different weights and skill levels, it is the International Laser that made its Olympic debut in 1996. With 76 sq. ft. of sail and a hull that measures 13'11", the International Laser is ideal for the singlehanded sailor of 150-180 pounds.
Visit the web page for the International Laser Class at: www.laserinternational.org
or the homepage for the North American Laser Class: www.laser.org

NeilPryde RS:X (Men and Women's Windsurfer)

Windsurfers are the fastest monohull sailing crafts in the world today. It is believed that there are more windsurfers worldwide today than all other sailboats combined, and their popularity continues to grow. This is due to the craft's small size, low cost, portability and the excitement of "flying" over the water. The sensation of speed is further enhanced by the sailor's close proximity to the water.
Debuting at the 1984 Summer Games, the windsurfing event utilized the Lechner II-design board in competition for three Olympiads, including the first women's Olympic windsurfing event which was introduced in 1992. In 1996, the Mistral replaced the Lechner for both the Men's and Women's divisions. And in 2005 the new NeilPride RX:S makes it's entry as Olympic class for the 2008 Games in China.
Windsurfers are great athletes and sailors. Physically, the best windsurfing sailors are tall, lean and agile. Standing while sailing, these athletes utilize tremendous upper body strength to support and control their rigs. Windsurfers are some of the most fit athletes at the Olympic games with aerobic requirements similar to those required for running a marathon.

Visit the web page for the International Winsurfing Association at: www.internationalwindsurfing.com

STAR (Men's Doublehanded Keelboat)

Requiring the best technical and racing skills, and, in return, giving the most fun! That's how Star sailors describe their boat which has competed in Olympic sailing since 1932, with the exception of 1976.
Much of the secret to the Star's success is the philosophy of keeping young while growing old. This means the competitiveness of the existing boats is assured while innovation and progress are encouraged. Thus, the Star class has pioneered many refinements now used as standard equipment on all racing sailboats. Supported by a worldwide association, the Star as a class is well-organized, with approximately 7,500 boats built over its 80 year history. Today, over 2,000 Stars are raced actively.
The oldest one-design craft, the Star's 1910-design by American Francis Sweisguth responded to the need to create a bigger, more comfortable and drier "Bug," which was a 17-foot keelboat popular at the time. The first one-design class, the Star revolutionized construction and racing rules. Sweisguth's hull design was ingenius. It has withstood the test of time and the application of new technology to remain at the forefront of international competition. Star World champions acknowledge their win by permanently changing their red mainsail star to gold.
Raced worldwide in over 170 fleets, the Star is a two-handed keelboat, with a sleek fiberglass hull and aluminum spars. Often called "The Torture Rack" because of the enormous 285-square-foot sail area, long boom and narrow waterline, this is a challenging boat to sail in heavy seas. The skipper and crew must be big (average combined weight of 420 lbs.), very fit and strong.
Visit the web page for the International Star Class at: www.starclass.org

TORNADO (Open Doublehanded Multihull)

Speed! Speed! Speed! The Tornado catamaran is the fastest Olympic class boat. With 15-20 knots average speed, at maximum, Tornados reach 30 knots.
The clean, stiletto-shaped 20'-long hull, large sail, light construction and low weight ratio explain Tornados' speed. 49 square metres of sail area over the catamaran's 9'11" beam give incredible acceleration. Five seconds before the gun and motionless at 30' from the start, Tornados will cross the line at the gun at top speed!
Tornado skippers know aerodynamics in order to control the boat's quick response to wind and waves. Often called "daredevils" because of the incredible boat speed and dangerous ease of capsize.
Designed in 1966 in England, specifically to be the Olympic class catamaran, the Tornado entered Olympic competition in 1976. Since then, the Tornado has undergone refinement of shape, construction techniques and sail plan, allowing the boat to go faster and faster. More than 1,300 Tornados are sailed worldwide. The simplicity of the Tornado design allied to its excellent performance has produced a boat of outstanding quality that delivers exciting competition and challenge-the sailing ultimate.
Visit the web page for the International Tornado Class at: www.tornado.org

YNGLING (Women's Triplehanded Keelboat)

The Yngling (pronounced "ING-ling") made its debut as an Olympic-class boat at the 2004 Olympic Regatta in Athens. The small keelboat was inspired by the then 14-year old son of Norway's Jan Herman Linge. Yngling, which means 'youngster' was developed by Linge in 1967, shortly after his previous design, the Soling, had been through the selection trials to be chosen an Olympic boat. Although similarities exist between the two designs, the Yngling is not a scaled down version of the Soling as many have suggested. With more beam, higher freeboard and fuller body-lines, the Yngling is a smaller, slower, lighter and more easily handled boat.
Designed for a crew of three with an optimal overall weight between 400-500 lbs. makes the Yngling suitable for average-sized people, and enhanced it's consideration as the equipment for the three-person women's keelboat event. Costing approximately $50,0000 with sails, it is a very expensive boat. Over 4,000 boats are sailing worldwide.
Visit the web page for the International Yngling Class at: www.yngling.org

*Thanks to the US Sailing Association

FAQ

What is the Canadian Sailing Team Division?
What is the ADC?
Who are the members of the ADC?
Who are the Staff members of the Canadian Sailing Team?
How do I qualify for the Canadian Sailing Team and Sport Canada Carding?
What do I receive as a carded athlete?
How are "Worlds Funding" and "Block Funding" calculated?
What Expenses can be claimed against World and Block Funding Allocations?
What types of Team Selection Criteria are utilized?
When will criteria relative to team selection be published?

What is the Canadian Sailing Team Division?

The Canadian Sailing Team Division is responsible for the development and maintenance of the high performance sailing programs that will ensure Canada’s best performance at the Olympic Games and international competitions. The division operates at the national team level for Olympic and Paralympic Games, Pan Am Games and Olympic/Paralympic/ISAF World Championships.

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What is the ADC?

The “ADC” is the Athlete Development Committee. The volunteer based committee responsible for establishing policy and criteria for the operation of the National Team Programs.

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Who are the members of the ADC?

ADC Chairperson: Phil Gow
Athlete Development Committee Members:

Frank McLaughlin
Tine Moberg-Parker
Quentin Pollock
Martin Tenhove 

Paul Davis
Oskar Johannson (Athlete Rep)


 

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Who are the Staff members of the Canadian Sailing Team?

High Performance Director:
High Performance Coordinator:

National Team Coach:
 

Ken Dool
Colleen Coderre

Brian Todd


 

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How do I qualify for the Canadian Sailing Team and Sport Canada Carding?

Visit http://www.sailing.ca/teams/canadian_sailing_team/selection_criteria/ for qualification criteria.

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What do I receive as a carded athlete?

As a carded member of the Canadian sailing team you receive access to the following:

  1. Financial Assistance Program and Tax Receipting
  2. Direct Financial Support from CYA via Block Funding and Worlds Funding, this support does not cover the total costs of any single program but rather helps offset costs associated with your training and competition program.
  3. Access to CYA boat insurance program.
  4. Sport Canada Athlete Assistance - $1500/month for Senior Card athletes and $900/month for Development Card Athletes or those carded at Senior Card level for first time.
  5. Access to tuition and deferred tuition programs through Sport Canada.
  6. Access to coaching support as designated/approved for each class by the High Performance Director
  7. Assistance in developing and monitoring annual training plan.
  8. Voice at the CYA Board Directors, Athlete Development Committee and Executive Committee via athlete representative as selected by team members.
  9. Voice at Canadian Olympic Committee, Athletes Can.
  10. Correspondence via email, web-site and mail-outs regarding activities and direction of the Canadian Sailing Team and the Canadian Yachting Association.
  11. Services of one of the Canadian Sport Centres.
  12. The benefits available through Athletes Can such as free cell phone and calling plans from Bell Mobility and free internet service from

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How are "Worlds Funding" and "Block Funding" calculated?

Worlds Funding: Financial support designated by the CST to each athlete, to be used exclusively for the purpose of qualifying for and/or attending the World Championships in the class in which you are carded.

Block Funding: Financial support designated by the CST to each athlete, to be used to offset costs related to all other approved training/competitive events.

Reimbursement of funding for activities outside these parameters will only be based on a pre-approved agreement with the High Performance Director.

The athlete allocations are based on the overall budgetary limits of the association.  Each Program / Athlete receives funding based on the priorities set out by the Olympic Development Committee working in conjunction and within the limits and directions of the Canadian Sport Review Panel.

The team is ranked according to the ranking structure set out in the annual Carding Criteria.  Athletes ranking within tier 1-3 attract the lion’s share of the available CYA funding while those in tier 4 and development level receive significantly less.

A similar system exists for paralympic athletes. 

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What Expenses can be claimed against World and Block Funding Allocations?

The following expenses can be claimed against World or Block funding allocation forms:

Travel:  
Air Travel:
Bus/Train:
Ferry/Taxi:
Car Rental
Private Auto
Actual return costs up to economy rates including connecting ground transportation. Original receipts, air coupons required.
Actual costs. Original receipts required.
Actual costs. Original receipts required.
Actual cost, including collision insurance. Original receipts required.
A rate of $0.36/km will be reimbursed. Gasoline receipts required.
A rate of $0.46/km will be reimbursed if towing. Gasoline receipts required.
Equipment Transport:  
Boat Shipment: Actual costs for container/shipping/airfreight/customs .... Original receipts required.
Accommodation:  
Hotel: Most economical possible with original receipts. Hotel/Motel receipt is required, credit card slip only is not sufficient.
$13.50/day will be reimbursed without receipts.
Meals:
Breakfast:
Lunch:
Dinner:
no receipts are required.
$10.00/day
$10.30/day
$27.60/day
Entry Fee: Receipt required for actual entry costs.


 

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What types of Team Selection Criteria are utilized?

Objective Criteria will be utilized by the Olympic Development Committee in decisions relative to athletes in the following areas:

  • National Team Status (i.e. selection to National Team for carding purposes, carding criteria is utilized)
  • Major Games Teams (e.g. Olympic Team, Paralympic Team, Pan American Games Team and other appropriate "Major Games" Teams)
  • CST Financial Support
  1. Block funding and Worlds blocks based on rank within team which is based on Carding Status:
    Tiers 1-4 and Development Athletes
     
  2. The ODC reserves the right to provide financial assistance to additional athletes as identified by, but not restricted to, the following:
    • "Elite" performers returning following "retirement" from Olympic Class sailing
    • Youth/Development athletes having demonstrated elite international performance at age group events
    • Recognized athletes’ having not achieved carding status

Areas where subjective criteria will be used in selecting athletes:

  • Training events, not limited to camps and clinics where "closed" training events require number limits (i.e. quality control, organizing authority stipulation, etc...)

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When will criteria relative to team selection be published?

Where objective criteria as outlined above are utilized for selecting athletes for participation in activities, the criteria to be used will be published in advance as per the Athlete Agreement.

Where subjective criteria are utilized as outlined above, the time frame over which athletes are evaluated will be published. The subjectivity used in selection is not realistically defined, as then it becomes an objective measure. Instead the ODC subjective evaluation is based on coach opinion of what is most appropriate and fundamentally sound in achieving the goals of the association in consideration of athlete interests. This evaluation will include but is not limited to: past performance in training and competition, estimation of future performance potential, team chemistry, value of long term CYA investment and so on.

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Canadian Sailing team

Each year, over 45 athletes, sailing one of the 11 Olympic or Paralympic Classes, qualify for the Canadian Sailing Team via a National Qualifying Regattas, European Championships or World Championships. Younger athletes (18 years and under) strive to reach the status of Canadian Youth Sailing Team member at the annual CYA Youth National Championships. In this section, find out more about the steps required for success in both youth and Olympic competitions, information on doping restrictions, and glimpse at the background of the current top Canadian athletes.

Canadian Sailing Team Members

National Team Pathway  **NEW**

National Team Selection Criteria (including Qualification Criteria for specific events)

CST FAQs

Olympic and Paralympic Classes

Results

Canadian Olympic Sailing Team History

Ethics (Doping, Eligibility, Misconduct...)

Resource Page Featuring useful links, application deadlines, funding opportunities